Category Archives: all the gory details

One of the recurring questions about my spindle sticks, especially from modern spinners, is “Why don’t they have a hook?” followed by “why don’t they have a notch?” and “how do you fix the yarn without hook or notch?” Finds … Continue reading

Posted in all the gory details, archaeology, spinning, textile techniques and tools, the market stall | 2 Comments

When I’m at the fairs, it’s always fun to explain the simple yet ingenious principle of the oillight to people. A lot of them get just as excited about these little things as I am – especially those with a … Continue reading

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As usually when I’ve been away for a few days, there is plenty of things stacking up that need to be de-stacked and processed and done and so on. So I’m trying to get back on track, whittling the mails … Continue reading

Posted in all the gory details, Bernuthsfeld Man | Leave a comment

I’m back home, my colleague is back home, and the Bernuthsfeld Man reconstruction is home, too. He has a lovely spot in the OLME in Emden now, right at the end of the exhibition part about the find and the … Continue reading

Posted in all the gory details, Bernuthsfeld Man | 6 Comments

So, after finding out that my drawing skills are indeed horrible, let’s look a bit more at diverse instances of yarnwinders in actual historical artwork. Images of yarnwinders are not that straightforward to find, so I’ve been using the yarnwinder … Continue reading

Posted in all the gory details, textile techniques and tools | 2 Comments

Let’s start out with taking a closer look at the yarnwinder with the perpendicular arms. This is how it looks when yarn is wound onto it: As you can see, it sort of looks like a V-shape made by the … Continue reading

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One of the many interesting things made out of wood and related to textile work are yarnwinders. One style is rather well known and still in use today – it’s what is usually called a niddy-noddy. The design is very … Continue reading

Posted in all the gory details, textile techniques and tools | Leave a comment