Category Archives: experimental archaeology

For those of you interested in the lightfastness tests, here are pictures! I covered the parts to be protected with cardboard and stuck the whole shebang into the window of our wintergarden, facing south. After 7 days, I took it … Continue reading

Posted in all the gory details, experimental archaeology, textile techniques and tools, Textilforum | Leave a comment

  For the industry, which has a considerable interest in knowing if their products will stand the test of time (especially if stuff is intended for outdoor use), there are a variety of tests and testing apparatus available, from placing … Continue reading

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There’s been comments about the lightfastness test setup which, in most cases for hobby and smallscale professional dyers, consists of picking a south-facing window and sticking stuff in there for a given amount of time… which is very obviously not … Continue reading

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Well, it’s a bit to wait until the prime season for lightfastness tests (three months in a south-facing window in summer, I’ve been told, would be the perfect thing), but the fabrics from the Dyeing Experiment are all set and … Continue reading

Posted in experimental archaeology | 2 Comments

One of the things about archaeological experiments is that they always take longer than expected… and then, in the aftermath, there’s… the aftermath. Which, in the case of the Pompeii Dyeing Experiment, involves making reference cards for the different dyeing … Continue reading

Posted in experimental archaeology, Textilforum | 1 Comment

A colleague of mine is doing PhD research about best practices in experimental archaeology and is looking for people belonging to a research or academic institution or carrying out independent activities. So if you are a demonstrator, crafter, re-enactor, or … Continue reading

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Did I say back to the usual stuff yesterday? Well, this year is starting off with exciting things only; for one thing, getting the Bernuthsfeld stuff to a close. (There’s just a few more patches to decide upon and to … Continue reading

Posted in experimental archaeology, spinning | 1 Comment