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Nächster Kurs in Erlangen: "Brettchenweben mit System", 31.8./01.09.

Im Kurs erkläre ich Brettchenweben nach einem System, mit dem die freie Musterbildung - ohne Musterschrift! - möglich ist. Der Kurs ist für Anfänger und Fortgeschrittene geeignet!

Mehr Informationen und Anmeldemöglichkeit: hier klicken.

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Colours!

I’ve gotten involved in a project, sort of, and that led to my finally stocking up on silk colours for the embroidery silks – emptying out the remainder of the undyed silk stock that I had left.

Somehow, this seems to be linked to fellow archaeologists prodding me – I actually started the project “embroidery silks” because a colleague, years ago, was asking me if I knew a source for naturally dyed silk, historically accurate, for embroidery. I looked around a bit and found out that this stuff was hard (read: impossible) to get. Then the usual thing happened – I looked around some more and found appropriate raw material (only slightly twisted mulberry silk), stuck my head together with my dyer, made her sigh and moan, and ended up with an assortment of embroidery silk colours.

Similarly, a few months ago, I got into contact with another colleague, who is working on a reproduction of an embroidery find, looking for appropriate threads to do the stitching… with a range of colours, most of which were not in my stock.

So soon, now, there will be some new colours in the shop for embroidery silk. I’m all excited that the colour range is finally a bit broader – with, among other things, a nice light, bright green, a darker blueish green and three shades of pinkish colours added in!

The new colours are already wound off, so one of the tasks for the next few days is to take photos of the current complete range and list the additional colours in the shop. The biggest challenge in this, by the way, is the photo-taking part, as a) colours and b) silks are notoriously hard to photograph…

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