Category Archives: papers and lectures

The maiden voyage of the Bronze Age boat has taken place, and you can watch a video of very happy people paddling right here: Apparently, they named her Morgawr. There’s also a summary video including a few scenes from the … Continue reading

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Thanks to a colleague tweeting, I stumbled across this really nice article about really nice research regarding the influence of our culture on how we perceive, for example, fairness. Or see the world. Or how easily we are fooled by … Continue reading

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There are things that are fast and easy to do, there are things that aren’t, and then there are things that will just gobble up all the available time and then some. Just like most of yesterday was gobbled up … Continue reading

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There is that article that I am writing (or, rather, re-writing according to the suggestions made by the reviewers). It’s about, who would have thought it, the never-ending spinning experiment. And it is driving me nuts. Why? Well, for one … Continue reading

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I have (of course) made use of the Cambridge Journal offer, but regrettably did not find much of interest for me in the 2012 yield of articles. (Though admittedly my topics are a bit special.) There is also the journal … Continue reading

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It’s hard to believe how time flies by – it’s January 10 already, and tomorrow evening, Karina Grömer will be visiting Erlangen to give a presentation about the Hallstatt textile finds and their reconstruction. In case you are interested, it … Continue reading

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If you’ve been more than marginally interested in the epidemic called “Black Death” that wrought havoc on the population in the Middle Ages, you may have caught that there was a (sometimes quite heated, I gather) dispute about whether it … Continue reading

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