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Vacation!

The summer has come, and it is time to take a break and go on holidays - so from July 13 to August 23, no orders will be sent out. If you place an order during this time, it will be sent off after the break.

From August 15 to August 19, I will be at the WorldCon in Dublin, with a stall in the dealer's hall. Do drop by if you're attending and say hello!

Have a wonderful summer and glorious holidays!

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Spindle Whorl Hit and Miss.

After showing you the dead whorls yesterday, it’s probably time to also show you the survivors – so here’s part of the yield, hanging out in a basket and feeling decorative:


By now, the whorls have all been weighed and are sorted in boxes – they range from below 8 g to almost 70 g in weight. The heavy ones are modeled after prehistoric whorl finds – and yes, it is astonishingly hard to match a given size and shape, as you can see here:

I find it really hard to make some shapes, among them the longish ones and the ones with a sort of T-profile. Roundish or double-conical is much easier for me, and I’m wondering if someone else would have a different experience, or if there’s some special technique to making these other shapes easily. You can see in the picture that I didn’t really match the original shape of whorl no. 14 – even though I tried really hard!

In some cases, with some shapes, I am quite happy with how close I got, though. Like with this one:

As a final note, it might amuse you that I managed to get only a few whorls within the weight range I was mostly aiming for – while I happened to (again) hit spot-on a few other ranges with a lot of whorls. If this continues, I might have to make a sale for these weight ranges!

This entry was posted in all the gory details, spinning, textile techniques and tools, the market stall. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Spindle Whorl Hit and Miss.

  1. Kathryn Leroux says:

    They look great! It’s really cool how you reproduced the ancient shapes.
    Your dedication to your craft and historically accurate reproduction is inspiring, but…
    Watching you firing them, I couldn’t help but comment that “the crazy neighbor lady is making a fire on the front lawn again!” LOL.

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